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And another CfP: Engaging with Screens: Art, Archive, Book

February 28, 2017

Call for Papers: Engaging with Screens: Art, Archive, Book

Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom, 31 May, 2017.

Deadline: 10 March, 2017

This interdisciplinary workshop invites participants to debate ways in which readers, publishers, archivists, and curators engage with the computer screen and its technologies for the purpose of accessing, preserving, and displaying textual material and paper artefacts. Is the persistence of books and book-like forms in the digital ecology an obstacle or necessity to our understanding of screen-based media? How far can innovative, digital forms stray from their recognizable counterparts in the analogue world before they become too alien for users? Can engagement with a screen effectively replace tactile engagement with a paper manuscript? The aim of the workshop is to explore mechanisms for the bibliographical ‘control’, display, and archiving of textual media in a digital environment; to develop a critical vocabulary for the purpose of examining the ontology and phenomenology of paper artefacts that migrate to screens; and to debate strategies for the preservation and display of digital and digitized texts. By looking for common ground in a collaborative, cross-disciplinary forum, we seek to provide a new account of textual ‘form’ and its accessibility in the digital environment. We welcome innovative cross-disciplinary approaches to these issues and also encourage proposals from specialists in the museum sector, publishing, and software industries.

Proposals for presentations (20 minutes) should be sent to Kathryn Brown (k.j.brown@lboro.ac.uk) and Wim van Mierlo (W.Van-Mierlo@lboro.ac.uk) by no later than 10 March, 2017. Proposals should contain an abstract (max 350 words) and a short biographical note (max 250 words).

 

 

Notification of the outcome of proposals will be sent by 24 March, 2017. Unfortunately, we are unable to offer financial support for travel or accommodation.

CfP Women’s History in the Digital World

February 28, 2017

whdw17_final

crowdfunding for families of murdered excavation workers Anas Ibrahim and Adamu Abdulrahim

February 28, 2017

conflict antiquities

As I heard through Alison Atkin and Jacq Matthews, Zacharys Anger Gundu, Akinwumi Ogundiran and Willeke Wendrich have opened a crowdfunding account for donations to Support the Families of Two Murdered Janjela Heroes, Anas Ibrahim and Adamu Abdulrahim, the excavation workers who were killed when they tried to prevent the kidnap of archaeologists Peter Breunig and Johannes Behringer.

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more and less information on the murder of excavation workers and kidnapping of archaeologists in Nigeria

February 27, 2017

conflict antiquities

More and less information has emerged in relation to the murder of excavation workers Anas Ibrahim and Adamu Abdulrahim and kidnapping of professor Peter Breunig and student Johannes Behringer. According to the Associated Press (AP) report, ‘Nigerian security forces… freed’ Breunig and Behringer.

The unfortunately phrased report observed that Kaduna State Governor Nasir Ahmad El-Rufai ‘commended the security agencies for their efforts in securing the release of the Germans’, though he did ‘not say whether anyone had been arrested for the kidnapping[s]’… or for the murders? (However, it was written by a journalist in Kaduna. Presumably, he used “kidnapping” to refer to the entirety of the event, including the murders.)

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kidnapped German archaeologists, professor Peter Breunig and student Johannes Behringer, have been freed in Nigeria

February 26, 2017

Good news, but my heart goes out to the families of the excavation workers

conflict antiquities

Police have relayed that the two German archaeologists who were kidnapped for ransom, professor Peter Breunig and student Johannes Behringer, have been freed. ‘No ransom was paid when they were freed’, according to the police (paraphrased by Reuters, which I learned via Paul Barford); though, equally, no details were given. Presumably, the police are still in pursuit of the murderers of the attempted rescuers, excavation workers Anas Ibrahim and Adamu Abdulrahim. Events took place around Janjala/Janjela/Jenjela village, Kadarko/Kagargo/Kagarko area (near the road between Kaduna airport and Abuja city), southern Kaduna state, north-western Nigeria.

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An Archaeodeath View on Archaeological Publishing

February 26, 2017

Archaeodeath

Every time I announce a new book is published, individuals both in and outside academic archaeology express outraged at the price. Very few academic books are anywhere near cheap and so sometimes this outrage is misguided and cliched. Sometimes, however, it is fully justified, reflecting a problematic, if not broken, publication system. This post wishes to reflect on this complex issue by taking a personal view from over the last two decades.

Anyone visiting this blog can find details of my publications here. As you will note, only a fraction of them appear in books: journal articles constitute a different issue that I won’t address these here. For books – my monograph and edited books – I have chosen publishers for a variety of factors other than cover-price. I confess, with the benefit of hindsight, I haven’t always done this wisely or successfully to ensure the best quality of product…

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update and correction: unknown gunmen have killed two excavation workers, kidnapped two archaeologists in Nigeria

February 26, 2017

conflict antiquities

Unfortunately, there has not been any more news on rescue efforts yet. However, I have found more reports with more details, so I have updated my post. Most importantly, I thought that the killed hunters had been security escorts, but other reports have shown that they were excavation workers. So, it is the case that five still-unknown gunmen (two with machetes, three with ‘heavy guns’) have killed two excavation workers, kidnapped two archaeologists in Nigeria. Most of the new information comes from interviews of Sani Aliyu and Usman Kagarko by Premium Times.

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