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CfP – Tea with the Sphinx

January 12, 2018

I can’t believe I re-tweeted this but forgot to post it on the blog, doh!

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TEA WITH THE SPHINX:

RECEPTION OF ANCIENT EGYPT’S MYTH, MAGIC AND MYSTICISM

28-30 JUNE 2018 UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM

 

At the first roundtable of ‘Tea with the Sphinx: Defining the Field of Ancient Egypt Reception Studies’ in September 2017 a debate arose surrounding the idea of ‘truth’, ‘facts’, the ways in which knowledge is formed in the popular imagination, and how this relates to reception studies as a field. This prompted discussion surrounding how reception studies should define itself, but also, and just as importantly, how myth, incorrect ‘facts’, and changing knowledge can be valuable in constructing a picture of how the knowledge of the ancient past and cultures has been formed, used and re-used, contributing to an ever-evolving history of the representation of ancient Egypt and its cultural offshoots.

Thus, the organisers of Tea with the Sphinx 2018 invite papers on any aspect of the reception of ancient Egypt in the global imagination, and especially those which engage with the following themes:

  • Myths, curses, and legends
  • Magic and ritual
  • Mysticism, occultism, and spiritualism
  • Re-incarnation and transcendental experiences
  • Orientalism and imperialism
  • Mummymania
  • Literature and fiction
  • Newspapers and the media
  • Visual representations and the arts
  • Replicas, souvenirs, and Egyptomania’s paraphernalia
  • Museums and display
  • Talismans and amulets
  • Science and ‘rational truth’ vs superstition
  • The ‘celebrity’ of Egyptology and Egyptologists
  • Historical ‘fact’ and evolving knowledge of ancient Egypt

Abstracts of up to 300 words for 20 minute papers along with a short biographical note (in the same Word document) should be sent to teawiththesphinx@gmail.com by February 9th 2018.

The organisers also encourage PGRs to submit ideas for poster presentations to be presented during lunch of the first day of the conference.

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Call for Papers – EAA Barcelona 2018

January 8, 2018

In relation to the previous post, Harn member, Ana Cristina Martins, has sent us the following:

24th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists – Reflecting Futures

Barcelona, 5-8 September https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2018

CALL FOR PAPERS – 2 Sessions (#302 and #598)

The deadline for submitting or modifying an abstract is 15 February 2018, 23h59 CET.

https://www.e-a-a.org/EAA2018/Programme

SESSION: #302

Gendered, diverse, inclusive archaeological museums? Proposals and experiences for a more equal approach to heritage

During the last decades more and more archaeological museums started to include a gender perspective and developed new exhibitions and educational projects. By establishing a critical attitude towards the traditional androcentric discourses and gender roles, museums started to make not only women, but also other marginalized groups in society more visible. Modern archaeological exhibitions seem to be more diverse and inclusive.

Therefore, it is time to present and discuss the different experiences carried out in recent years in European archaeological museums with more gendered, diverse and inclusive approaches, in order to develop a framework of reflection in a “museology of gender and diversity”, conceived as a more integrative, social and egalitarian approach to the heritage presented there.

Paper and poster proposals may include topics like

– theoretical advances in the studies of gender archaeology and its reflection in museums

– museums as an educational tool to achieve gender equality

– experiences in community museums and temporary exhibitions

– public studies as a diagnostic tool to advance in education of equality

– aspects of communication, journalism and merchandising

– experiences of museum educational service and informative departments

With the organization of this session, we intend to highlight the idea that archaeological museums can transmit an inclusive history that helps to make visible the traditionally marginalized groups of society, in order to contribute to a more egalitarian education and to provide a more equal approach to heritage.

Keywords:

Museums, archaeology, gender, diversity, Heritage

Main organiser:

Prof. Lourdes PRADOS TORREIRA (Spain)

Co-organisers:

Prof. Doris Gutsmiedl-Schümann (Germany)
Dr. Ana Cristina Martins (Portugal)

 

SESSION: #598

Archaeology and interdisciplinarity & interdisciplinarity in archaeology: stories of a long and diversified journey (19th-21st centuries)

Rooted in scientific areas as diverse as architecture and geology, archaeology was affirmed in the 19th century through collaboration with other disciplines such as philology and anthropology. On the other hand, archaeology played a fundamental role in the establishment of the fields of conservation and restoration. Meanwhile, it was contemplated in heritage policy and legislation, contributed to the production of knowledge divulged in different supports and ways, as well as to the development of the tourism.

Bringing together interests, purposes and procedures defined by different actors, individual and collective, public and private, local, regional, national and transnational, archaeology has been evolving theoretically and methodologically due to new ways of looking at the past. New ways that have been and are being generated by (and together to) other human and social sciences, as well as enhanced and / or urged by exact and natural sciences.

This session invites papers and posters dealing with topics such as:

– archaeology and other sciences;

– interdisciplinarity, reanalysis and reuses of the past;

– archaeology, heritage preservation and museums;

– teaching archaeology;

– archaeology, journalism, mass communication, digital platforms and new social nets;

– archaeology, cultural tourism and sustainable development.

Following the previous seminar organized within the research project ‘InterArq-Archaeology and Interdisciplinarity’ (Barcelona, 2017) this session aims to obtain a broader (geographical, chronological and thematic) picture of this issue.

Keywords:

Archaeology, Interdisciplinarity; Reanalysis; Reuses.

Main organiser:

Dr. Ana Cristina MARTINS (Portugal)

Co-organisers:

Prof. Isabel Ordieres Díez (Spain)

EAA Barcelona – call for papers

January 8, 2018

Harn member, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, has been in touch about the next meeting of the EAA, Margarita says:

I would like to draw your attention to the sessions organized at the EAA 2018 (https://www.e-a-a.org/EAA2018) in Barcelona on 5-8 September. There is a very simple search engine  https://www.e-a-a.org/EAA2018/ScientificProgramme that allows searchers to find sessions by keyword or any word or name in title/abstract information. It is really easy to use (NOTE  that it is half way down the page). 

Find below the list of sessions that have been proposed relating to the history of archaeology. Please, take into account that the deadline for the call for papers is 15 February

LIST OF SESSIONS

603 Alibi Archaeologies: Excavating in Archives, Museums and Storerooms
https://eaa.klinkhamergroup.com/eaa2018/sessions/overview/preview.php?id=603

671 THERE IS MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE: UNVEILING THE HISTORIES OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL COLLECTIONS
https://eaa.klinkhamergroup.com/eaa2018/sessions/overview/preview.php?id=671

598 ARCHAEOLOGY AND INTERDISCIPLINARITY & INTERDISCIPLINARITY IN ARCHAEOLOGY: STORIES OF A LONG AND DIVERSIFIED JOURNEY (19TH-21ST CENTURIES)
https://eaa.klinkhamergroup.com/eaa2018/sessions/overview/preview.php?id=598

628 The past and future of hillforts – challenges, chances, perspectives
https://eaa.klinkhamergroup.com/eaa2018/sessions/overview/preview.php?id=628

81 Political Matters in Prehistory: Papers in Honor of Antonio Gilman Guillén
https://eaa.klinkhamergroup.com/eaa2018/sessions/overview/preview.php?id=81

Notification of New Publication

January 8, 2018

COPERTA CSERNI PT. BT rez. mica-page-001

Harn member, Csaba Szabó, has been in touch to inform us about the publication of his new edited volume Adalbert Cserni and his Contemporaries The Pioneers of Archaeology in Alba Iulia and Beyond. Edited by Csaba Szabó, Viorica Rusu-Bolindeț, Gabriel Tiberiu Rustoiu and Mihai Gligor this book is written in English, divided into 5 sections with chapters by many leading scholars:

I. THE LIFE AND WORK OF ADALBERT CSERNI

Csaba Szabó: Reconstructing Béla Cserni’s biography

Viorica Rusu-Bolindeț: Adalbert Cserni’s contribution at the discovery of Governor’s Palace from Apulum – old and new perspectives

Radu Ota:Adalbert Cserni and the Roman provincial art. Case studies from Apulum

II. SOCIAL AND ACADEMIC NETWORK OF THE PIONEERS OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Irina Achim, Corina Borș: Grigore Tocilescu – a Pioneer of Romanian Archaeology in a European Perspective

Ioan Bejinariu: Fetzer J. Ferencz (1856–1939) and the Archaeology from Sălaj

Olivér Gábor: Szőnyi Ottó’s time capsule from 1913

Kirill Gusev: The visit of D. N. Anuchin in Europe (1877–1879) and the international
cooperation in archaeology and physical anthropology

Eszter Istvánovits: András Jósa and his Contemporaries

Jenny Kaurin: Charles Cournault (1815–1904) á la découverte des collections pre-romaines en Europe de L’Ouest (1873–1880)

Emanoil Pripon: Dr. Mártonfi Lajos (1857–1908), a precursor of Transylvanian Museology

Vladislav Sobolev: People and fates. Pioneers of medieval archaeology in North-Western Russia (1870–1914)

Adrienn Wéber: Juhász László (1842–1911), a pioneer of archaeology and antiquarian as founder of the Museum of Pécs

III. THE BEGINNINGS OF URBAN ARCHAEOLOGY IN EUROPE

Florin-Gheorghe Fodorean: Archaeological sites recorded by Téglás István in the territory of Potaissa

Ana Cristina Hamat: Stories about Tibiscum. The research carried out by the priest Iosif Mircea at the Roman ruins from Jupa

Julien Trapp: Johann Baptist Keune and Metz Museums (Moselle, France). The birth
of modern archaeology in the annexed region of Lorraine (1892–1918)

IV. FROM ANTIQUARIAN COLLECTIONS TO THE FIRST MUSEUMS

Cristina Bodó: Archaeological research undertaken by the members of the History and
Archaeology Society of Hunedoara County

Delia Roxana Cornea: Unpublished testimonies about the beginnings of museology in Dobrudja in the late 19th century

Evgenia Zastrozhnova: Archaeological materials from the excavations of Phanagoria (19th century) in the collection of the State Historical Museum (Moscow)

V. NATIONALISM AND OTHER IDEOLOGIES

Phil Freeman: The consequences of Francis Haverfield’s visits east of Vienna in the 1880s

Heinrich Zabehlicky: A political research-history: The case of Bruckneudorf between Hungary and Austria

Laura Coltofean: Zsófia Torma: A pioneer of prehistoric archaeology in nineteenth-century Transylvania

Béla Santa: In ‘the interest of science… from distant Transylvania’: Zsófia Torma’s research for British academic patronage

Csaba Szabó: Histories of archaeology in Transylvania. A short overview

Maria Medvedeva: The Imperial Archaeological Commission (1859–1919) and the national system of archaeological investigation in Russia

HARN WELCOMES NEW MEMBERS

January 8, 2018

OUR NETWORK IS GROWING AND WE HAVE A NEW MEMBER TO WELCOME:

Emilie Sibbesson, Canterbury Christ Church University

emilie.sibbesson@canterbury.ac.uk

I’m a lecturer in archaeology at Canterbury Christ Church University, UK, and have research interests in food technology, histories of agriculture, and the history of archaeology. My research project ‘Telling Time: Oscar Montelius and Britain’ explores the exchange of ideas between Montelius and his British contemporaries through study of the correspondence preserved in the Montelius collection of the Antiquarian-Topographical Archive (ATA) in Stockholm, Sweden.

Welcome, Emilie, and many thanks for joining our community!

 

CfP – Museums, Collections and Conflict, 1500-2010.

January 3, 2018
I’ve been sent the following call for papers by the Museums and Galleries History Group:
MGHG BIENNIAL CONFERENCE 2018
MUSEUMS, COLLECTIONS AND CONFLICT, 1500-2010
13-14 JULY 2018, NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM
Keynote speaker: Annie Coombes, Professor of Material and Visual Culture, Birkbeck, University of London
Call for papers
Museums have been profoundly shaped by war and armed conflict, and have also played a significant part in shaping understandings and memories about them. Yet there has been little sustained examination of the way museums in war and war in museums has played out. Since Gaynor Kavanagh’s foundational study Museums and the First World War in 1994, and with the publication this year of Catherine Pearson’s similarly ground-breaking Museums in the Second World War, it is clear that museums have played and can play an important role in helping society address such crisis situations. On the home front, for example, museums have helped society prepare for war and armed conflict. In leading commemoration in the aftermath of war and armed conflict, museums have helped society come to terms with what happened, understand why it happened, and remember sacrifices. Yet museums have equally served as arenas where issues such as commemoration have been contested and negotiated, and where particular narratives legitimising war and conflict have been developed. This conference hopes to address a broad range of questions, including on collecting (in) war and armed conflict, on the deliberate targeting and destruction or safeguarding of museums and cultural property, and the broader range of institutions brought forth or which are strongly influenced by war and armed conflict.
We seek papers which particularly address but are not restricted to the following questions over a period from the Early Modern to the end of the twentieth century:
•    What have museums done during periods of conflict and what has happened to them? Have they been responsible for morale, have they been targets of attack, have they physically moved and how has their staffing been affected?
•    How have museums and collections acted to commemorate conflict?
•    In what ways have wars and other conflicts affected museums’ and collectors’ collecting activities, positively or negatively? How have wars and conflicts been collected, and by whom?
•    How have museums represented war, civil war and other conflicts such as rebellions? Have museums promoted peace by interpreting war?
•    How have museums OF conflict, of the armed forces and of weaponry/armouries developed historically?
We welcome proposals for papers which deal with the history of museums and collecting in a British, European or wider context or which address the relationships between different geographical areas.
Paper proposals should be for papers of 20 minutes’ length. Proposals should be 250 words max and include the name, contact details and affiliation (if applicable) of the speaker.
Panel proposals are strongly encouraged and should consist of a panel title, proposals for 3 papers, along with a rationale for the panel theme, and contact details and affiliations (if applicable) of all participants. Please indicate whether you will provide a chair for your session or not (it does not matter which).
Poster proposals are also welcomed. Please contact Kate Hill (khill@lincoln.ac.uk) for more information.
All the above proposals should be sent to contact@mghg.info by 1 March 2018. Please note all speakers and poster presenters will be expected to pay the conference registration fee.

Safe Havens

December 31, 2017

How did I miss this? Superb piece by William Carruthers. File under the ever expanding categories of ‘no, archaeology isn’t more important than people’ and ‘Just stop killing people ffs’

william carruthers: fragments

What does it mean to be ‘safe’, and what does it mean to be ‘endangered’? Who or what defines these terms, and who or what can these categories be used to characterise? On 2–3 December 2016, a conference entitled “Safeguarding Endangered Cultural Heritage” took place in Abu Dhabi, organised jointly by the governments of France and the United Arab Emirates, and held under the patronage of UNESCO. The Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, Shaykh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, was in attendance, as was French President François Hollande and the Director-General of UNESCO, Irina Bokova; many other dignitaries joined them. The (mostly male, and distinctly elite) diplomatic spectacle was a sight to behold.

The pronouncements emanating from the conference’s podium were also attention-grabbing. Al Nahyan stated that “the destruction of heritage sites by terrorist groups, and illicit trafficking by groups that aim to obliterate the international heritage of humanity, are…

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