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February 20, 2017

Amara has sent the following notice:

Please join us at the UCL Grant Museum of Zoology for a panel discussion, to be followed by a drinks reception, to mark the publication ofCollecting, Ordering, Governing: Anthropology, Museums and Liberal Government (Duke University Press, 2017) and to explore its themes with two of the book’s co-authors, Nélia Dias (Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, ISCTE University Institute of Lisbon and Centre for Research in Anthropology Portugal) and Rodney Harrison(Professor of Heritage Studies at the UCL Institute of Archaeology), with invited panellists Elizabeth Edwards (Emeritus Professor of Photographic History, De Montfort University; Andrew W. Mellon Visiting Professor, V&A Research Institute; and Honorary Professor, Department of Anthropology, UCL), Johanna Zetterstrom-Sharp (Curator of Anthropology at the Horniman Museum and British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at Cambridge University), and Caroline Cornish(Postdoctoral Research Associate, Department of Geography, Royal Holloway, University of London). The discussion will be chaired by Alice Stevenson (Senior Lecturer in Museum Studies, UCL Institute of Archaeology). 

Collecting, Ordering, Governing is an outcome of a collaborative Australian Research Council-funded research project undertaken by its seven authors and led by Tony Bennett which explored the relationships among anthropological fieldwork, museum collecting and display, and social governance in the early twentieth century in Australia, Britain, France, New Zealand, and the United States. Drawing on case studies ranging from the Musée de l’Homme’s 1930s fieldwork missions in French Indo-China to the influence of Franz Boas’s culture concept on the development of American museums, the book aims to illuminate recent debates about postwar forms of multicultural governance, cultural conceptions of difference, and postcolonial policy and practice in museums.

See https://www.dukeupress.edu/collecting-ordering-governing for further information and to read the introduction online.

Attendance is free but registration via Eventbrite is compulsory and ticket numbers are limited.

See https://collecting-ordering-governing.eventbrite.com for further information and to RSVP.

Organised by the UCL Institute of Archaeology Heritage Section.

Upcoming UCL events

February 20, 2017

Katy Soar (Royal Holloway)

Postcards as Archives: “Excavating” Popular Archaeology at the Turn of the Century

22 February 2017, 6-7 pm, Room 612, UCL Institute of Archaeology

Sir Arthur Evans’ excavations at the Palace of Knossos on Crete were the beginning of the development of what is now the most popular tourist spot on the island. From the very start, this site was created to be a living monument, a theatre of the past, albeit a specific vision of the past. One method this vision was disseminated was through the use of the picture postcard. While the discipline of archaeology has paid little attention to these non-official discourses, transmitted by popular culture, they play an important role in the transmission of particular images about the past.

The heyday of the tourist postcard was the Edwardian period – the period which coincides with the excavations Evans at the Palace. Through their mass-production and circulation among particular groups of people, postcards transformed a place into a commodity for global consumption. This talk will examine various examples of these representations of Knossos to show how they produced an enduring picture of the Minoans and consider how far the performativity, circulation and consumption of these specific images of the Palace authenticate understanding of the past.

 

Tina Paphitis (UCL Institute of Archaeology) 

Sagas & Socialism: William Morris in Iceland

14 March 2017, 6-7 pm, Room 209, UCL Institute of Archaeology

The past and its remains have played a major role in the formation of a sense of place, and have been the inspiration behind numerous artistic and political outputs, as studies in historical consciousness and the archaeological imagination have revealed. This talk considers these concepts in the context of historical travellers’ motivations to visit, and their experiences of, other lands. It will focus on the artist, writer, poet and political activist William Morris (1834-1896) and his travels to Iceland in 1871 and 1873.

Examining Morris’s travel accounts alongside his artistic and political expressions, this talk will consider how his travels to Iceland began long before he set foot on the island, through his own interpretation and imagination of its Sagas. The Sagas in turn provided a blueprint for Morris’s itineraries and, whilst in Iceland, reinforced his socialist ideology. In this way, we shall see how an engagement with historical and archaeological remnants is not only a source of inspiration for contemporary endeavours, but an act of travel itself

illicit trafficking, provenance research and due diligence… and confidence and risk

February 16, 2017

conflict antiquities

Last year, UNESCO hosted a round table on the movement of cultural property in 2016: regulation, international cooperation and professional diligence for the protection of cultural heritage. (See the programme.)

View original post 1,030 more words

Cheerful Report

February 16, 2017

Life has been somewhat grim over in HARN Towers and we’re now in the midst of half-term (as ever thank you so much LCC, really grateful for a school holiday in February, bah) so my brain is fried.

Rather than focussing on the sad, let’s look at the cheerful things that have happened since I last blogged: the nearly-five-year-old is now five, She is well and truly five. You couldn’t be more five than she is and we have the pink sparkly house to prove it. She had several parties and several cakes. We had the perennial favourite – the hedgehog cake

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To ring the changes, there was also a heart shaped cake and I’m aware I’d fail health and hygiene on so many counts. But, he’s a very handsome cat

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There were also many butterfly/fairy cakes, so many that despite the lure of sweets and butter icing my child labourers wandered off leaving me to do the decorating. It turns out that when left to myself with small cakes I am easily bored and start making faces to amuse myself

I am a little caked out now. It’s Rick’s birthday this weekend but we’re off to Scarborough and the cake is his Mam’s responsibility, thankfully, I dread to think what I’d come up with, something like these I suspect.

However, it’s not just cakes around here, oh no, I have more joy to spread, Martyn found this on his camera and sent it to me

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Copyright Martyn Barber – I wonder where I could get hold of one

One of his children gave it to him as a present, maybe I should show it to our children so they’re inspired in time for Rick’s birthday?

Martyn also sent me this

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Copyright Martyn Barber

Yes, it’s a biplane, yes that is a prehistoric settlement-thing, no, haven’t a clue what the connection is. To be fair I didn’t ask, I just ran with the idea of prehistoric planes, extreme anthropology/time travel, the Mysterious Cities of Gold and all the other nonsense that happens in my head when children have been talking to me all day. There is undoubtedly a very good reason why Historic England have commissioned a replica biplane*, and some prehistoric houses to put on Salisbury Plain, but why let the truth get in the way of a good eyebrow-wiggling ‘huh’ moment?

I will be back next week, hopefully with something other than cake/gnomes/planes to tell you about

Julia

*Martyn tells me it’s a completely accurate replica except for the lack of engine, I can’t help feeling this is a good thing since I’m generally law abiding and my first thought was the lack of engine would make it harder to steal. However, if it does go missing, and I don’t blog for a while there may be a connection . . .

 

Funded PhD on the Photographic Archive of OGS Crawford

February 14, 2017

The Department of History Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck, University of London and the Institute of Archaeology/Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford are pleased to announce the availability of a fully funded three-year doctoral grant 2017-20, to work on the photographic archive of the archaeologist O. G. S. Crawford.

Crawford was one of the most influential archaeologists of the last century and photography was central to his work and influence. Recent moves within archaeology and anthropology have come to see photographs not as mere records or representations of the world beyond the frame, but as interventions in shaping understandings of that world, as items that have their own power and sets of affects. The photographic work of Crawford, and the relationship between archaeology and photography, will be explored in this exciting studentship.

The main emphasis of the PhD will be on scanning and ordering Crawford’s photographic collections. Consideration will be given to the changing technology of photography from 1914 to the 1950s, the period over which Crawford worked, as well as to the links and differences between aerial and on-the-ground photography. By working with other elements of Crawford’s archive, as well as publications by Crawford and others, such as Kitty Hauser, the student will consider how the photographs derived out of and fed into Crawford’s intellectual interests in landscapes and buildings as historical documents, as well as his changing politics.

The studentship will result in: i) a PhD thesis; ii) the digitisation of the Crawford collection, and its hosting online, in collaboration with Institute of Archaeology; iii) at least one exhibition event in the Pitt Rivers Museum; iv) either a stand-alone blog or a series of contributions to the Institute of Archaeology’s archives blog and the PRM’s Photograph and Manuscript Collections blog; vi) a public gallery talk at the PRM as part of its ‘Saturday Spotlight’ series; vii) academic presentations at conferences or seminar series.

This studentship is funded through the AHRC’s Collaborative Doctoral Partnership scheme. Collaboration between a Higher Education Institution and a museum, library, archive, or heritage organisation is the essential feature of these studentships. This project will be supervised jointly by Dr Lesley McFadyen and Dr Jennifer Baird (Birkbeck) and Professor Chris Gosden and Dr Chris Morton (Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford) and the student will be expected to spend time at both Birkbeck and Oxford, as well as becoming part of the wider cohort of CDP funded students across the UK.

Eligibility

You must:

•Have a first or upper-second class honours degree or equivalent.

•Have completed a masters-level qualification, or be expecting to complete this by the time you start your PhD study.

•Be a resident of the UK or European Economic Area (EEA).

•In general, full studentships are available to students who are settled in the UK and have been ordinarily resident for a period of at least three years before the start of postgraduate studies. Fees-only awards are generally available to EU nationals resident in the EEA. International applicants are normally not eligible to apply for this studentship.

If you wish to inquire further about this studentship please contact Dr McFadyen

How to apply:

Please consult the general guidance on how to apply for an Archaeology MPhil/PhD place in the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck. Please note that two references must be submitted with the application, and take particular care to indicate in the application the broad areas of research that you are interested in. All prospective students are strongly advised to first make informal contact with the supervisor, Dr McFadyen.

Deadline for applications is Monday 20 March 2017.

Published: 13 February 2017

HARN 2017?

February 3, 2017

We’re having discussions over in HARN towers. In fact, we haven’t had a picture of HARN towers for a while, let me remedy that

HARN Towers

(I think we may need a different flag, and it does look worryingly empty, the reality would be full of books, cake, computers and coffee – probably also shiny things if the very-soon-to-be-five year old has anything to do with it.)

So, over here in HARN Towers discussions are taking place and we think we know what we’re doing -but we reserve the right to change our minds, do something completely different and look at you blankly if you mention our previous intentions, ok? – the plan this year is not to have a formal conference. Arranging the last two has taken a lot of time and organisation, plus the publishing side of things didn’t go according to plan after HARN 2016. So, we’re sort of taking a year off, but only sort of, let me explain – rather than a conference we’re going to organise a couple of workshops. One will be held in the USA and one will be held in the UK. They’ll have the same theme which will be announced when we do a joint call for papers, if you want to join us then just sign up for the one nearest you – or the country you most want to visit. Or, y’know, whichever country will allow your nationals to visit. Right now the UK isn’t banning any nationals, but give us a couple of years . . .

Where was I? Workshops. 2017. Autumn, most likely. Venues and theme to be announced. We’ve got various ideas for themes, there was the suggestion way back of ephemera, or we could follow up Kate’s post about correspondence.  Or we could go for another subject entirely, Antiquarians maybe given how strongly we all seem to feel about this? But I think that should be the subject of a bigger and more formal meeting – which leads me nicely to HARN 2018.

In 2018 HARN will be 10 years old. We have to celebrate this! We’re thinking of holding a swanky conference somewhere flash, and this is another reason to take a year off from formal conferencing, if it’s going to be flashy it’s going to need a lot of planning and we’re going to have to organise funding and all sorts of other stuff. So watch this space for details and do volunteer because we are going to need lots of help on this one.

Now, do not misunderstand me, the workshops are going to be good and interesting (and to be honest I really don’t know the difference between a workshop and a conference – even if I do now know what a symposium consists of) they are in no way to be considered as less important than a full conference. We still intend to publish the papers given and we know they’ll be of the usual high standard given our wonderful members, we’re just hoping it will be less organisational work and we’ll have some reserves of time/energy/sanity into ensuring we celebrate our (first) decade appropriately. And, you can help! You could propose a venue, help us raise money, get involved with the organisation, suggest a theme, whatever time and skills you have now is the occasion to volunteer them.

And, have a great weekend while you consider this (mine’s going to be dominated by a 5th birthday party, think pink, think sparkles, think mayhem!)

Julia

 

UCL IoA History of Archaeology Network

February 1, 2017
Upcoming events:
Katy Soar (Royal Holloway)
Postcards as Archives: “Excavating” Popular Archaeology at the Turn of the Century
22 February 2017, 6-7 pm, Room 612, UCL Institute of Archaeology

Sir Arthur Evans’ excavations at the Palace of Knossos on Crete were the beginning of the development of what is now the most popular tourist spot on the island. From the very start, this site was created to be a living monument, a theatre of the past, albeit a specific vision of the past. One method this vision was disseminated was through the use of the picture postcard. While the discipline of archaeology has paid little attention to these non-official discourses, transmitted by popular culture, they play an important role in the transmission of particular images about the past.

The heyday of the tourist postcard was the Edwardian period – the period which coincides with the excavations Evans at the Palace. Through their mass-production and circulation among particular groups of people, postcards transformed a place into a commodity for global consumption. This talk will examine various examples of these representations of Knossos to show how they produced an enduring picture of the Minoans and consider how far the performativity, circulation and consumption of these specific images of the Palace authenticate understanding of the past.

Tina Paphitis (UCL Institute of Archaeology) 
Sagas & Socialism: William Morris in Iceland
14 March 2017, 6-7 pm, Room 209, UCL Institute of Archaeology
The past and its remains have played a major role in the formation of a sense of place, and have been the inspiration behind numerous artistic and political outputs, as studies in historical consciousness and the archaeological imagination have revealed. This talk considers these concepts in the context of historical travellers’ motivations to visit, and their experiences of, other lands. It will focus on the artist, writer, poet and political activist William Morris (1834-1896) and his travels to Iceland in 1871 and 1873. 
 
Examining Morris’s travel accounts alongside his artistic and political expressions, this talk will consider how his travels to Iceland began long before he set foot on the island, through his own interpretation and imagination of its Sagas. The Sagas in turn provided a blueprint for Morris’s itineraries and, whilst in Iceland, reinforced his socialist ideology. In this way, we shall see how an engagement with historical and archaeological remnants is not only a source of inspiration for contemporary endeavours, but an act of travel itself.